Monday, March 3, 2008

Question for the hive mind: Peperomia argyreia

I have a guess, but I wanted to throw this out there for input. I have a Peperomia argyreia that I started from a leaf, which has been doing well enough for a while, but now that it's finally getting in new leaves which are big enough to show the patterning, they're coming in split and browning on the edges.



I took these pictures yesterday while watering, and the plant in question had gotten very dry (accidentally), so that could be it. The spot it's in is also probably warmer than most of the apartment, and the humidity isn't amazingly high, but it should be higher than most of the apartment. There is zero chance that the plant's getting damaged mechanically (from people brushing against it or whatever).



Whatever it is, the plants at work have done it too, on occasion, though never quite this bad. What does everybody think?


7 comments:

Mr. Green Genes said...

Funny. This weekend I found that my two peperomias (both Caperata, one of them Variegata) also had brown edges, although not as lace-like as yours.

In one case (the Variegata) the edge was mushy. In the other case, only the points of the leaves were brownish.

I also put this problem down to lack of water. Indeed, after having watered them both, the mush disappeared overnight.

And yes, at the beginning I also thought about mechanics- my Peperomias are drooping and some of the leaves do touch the edges of the terracotta pots. And I had moved stuff around...

However, the surprising rapidity with which the mushiness disappeared after watering...

shiver said...

My argyreia has been doing that same ragged-edge thing since I bought over a year ago. I've tried everything I can think of (brighter/lower light, higher humidity, keeping it wetter/drier, changing feeding, warmer/cooler temps) but the ragged edges continue. It's getting pretty ugly and I'm thinking of throwing in the towel. Perhaps this is a plant that doesn't appreciate the indoor environment so much... :(

I'll be checking back to see if anyone has answers....

S.M. Sedwick said...

In the past couple of weeks, I have looked at this plant in two different plant stores, and didn't buy it either time because all the plants had this problem on at least a quarter of the leaves.

Well, even if nobody knows what it is, at least you can be sure it's not some problem that's specific to your apartment!

Tracy said...

I have a few plants, including a pepperomia that does this too, and I haven't the slightest clue as to what causes it. Could it be lack of a certain nutrient......but that being said, you never want to feed a sick plant......don't you wish plants could talk sometimes.....lol.

mr_subjunctive said...

Now that I think about it, I have another Peperomia that did this for a while, too, but it stopped eventually.

The growers' guide says that Peperomias don't like fluctuations in moisture level, from very wet to very dry and back again, but otherwise he's no help. I think I'm going to try watering more often on the one at home, and see if that makes a difference, but it'll take a while before I know. That's the only guess I've been able to come up with so far. I should have asked WCW yesterday, but I forgot.

alenka said...

I've never grown a peperomia, but I have a begonia that has been doing this, some of the new leaves splitting as they grow. I saw your post back when you just posted it, and I thought of the begonia right away. I had no idea what the reason could be, I've kind of thought that this particular begonia is just weird like this. But today I repotted the plant, and it was at a point when I would otherwise water it, and it turned out that the soil was dry all the way through the pot -- I didn't think it would be quite that dry. So now I'm thinking that the splitting leaves are an underwatering problem. Now that I'm thinking about it, when this plant was younger, it didn't have the splitting problem, so I guess it grew too fast and I didn't adjust to its increased water needs. It's odd though because I don't see any other potential signs of underwatering -- ok, maybe a dry tip or two, but nothing else, and the roots looked excellent. But the soil was definitely too dry. So I'm going to water more often, and see if that gets rid of the splitting leaves. Please post when you figure out how your peperomia reacts to more watering, or if WCW has an opinion about this.

Anonymous said...

Wow. Exactly the same thing is happening with my argyreias, and I've been going crazy trying to figure out what I'm doing wrong. Come to think of it, the only thing I did that helped was dividing and repotting them, which probably helped 'cause they were then in slightly bigger pots with slightly fewer roots and therefore stayed wet longer. Guess I'll try watering more!