Sunday, October 25, 2009

Sometimes I hate marketers.

Things like this are why.

Poor Sansevieria cylindrica.


8 comments:

Claude said...

well, at least it's not doomed to die... they're easy plants. But you are left wondering, exactly what orifice did they pull this idea out of?

lynn'sgarden said...

I'm sure many people are fooled, but we know better!
Need to find a big chunk of time to visit last week's posts...I've been away and now trying to make-up time. Enjoy your Sunday, Mr_Subj ;)

Kenneth Moore said...

At Garden District, the closest planty store to me, they have these braided for $15.

I thought it not worth the money. It's like bonsai.

Water Roots said...

I just saw these at Home Depot a couple of days ago. I thought they were beautiful when I spotted them (definitely new), but they were priced a little high, so I didn't pick any up. Next time I'm at Home Depot, I'm going to check their lable and see how they're being marketed.

our friend Ben said...

You only hate marketers *sometimes*, Mr. S.? How disappointing! Let's hope this bunch suggested wearing the "wisdom horns" on one's head so their IQ-enhancing benefits could tranfer directly to the brain...

Hap said...

And they are just separate leaf cuts stuck in the pots, rather than a single plant.

I saw them at one of the big wholesalers last week... and had to laugh at the odd but perfect planting plan in each pot. But by selling 3, 5 or 7 rooted leaves artfully arranged they turn the crop at least a year faster.Smart marketing, but at least to me it feels like questionable horticulture.

Happy Hermit (Happilyhiddenhermit@gmail.com) said...

I feel so horrible for them when they are braided , I really do.

amy grace said...

Thanks for providing the actual plant name! I've been eyeballing the "wisdom horns" at the local market for months, they finally cut the price in half and I brought the last remaining plant home tonight. I knew the name was nonsense. They've also glued those decorative rocks together, it's going to be a pain to dislodge the poor plant for re-potting.