Sunday, March 20, 2011

Pretty pictures: Freesia NOIDs


I've learned, as of Friday, that I am unable to smell Freesias. This is not unheard of, though it's kinda sad, because everybody goes on and on about how wonderful the smell is. To me, it smells like cut grass, with a little bit of generic floral smell, but very far away. And it's not that I happened to catch them during a period of low fragrance output (which the link above says does happen), because Younger Former Co-Worker was right there, gushing about the wonderfulness of the smell, when I tried.


*sigh*

These are, I think, the first Freesias I've seen. The ex-job never had them when I worked there; I don't remember seeing them anywhere else.

(This one is my favorite.)

Those of you who can smell them, tell me -- what do they smell like? Does anybody grow them, indoors or out? How's that going? I'm curious.


14 comments:

Bom said...

I never heard of plants that had a fragrance to which human noses were selective. Did I say that right? I am now interested to find some freesias to see to which group my nose belongs.

Greensparrow said...

I've grown them a couple times -- as a tender bulb, ones indoors under lights (barely successful) and once outdoors (more successful).
I love the smell, perhaps my favorite smelling flower ever... but what do they smell like? God... smells are so impossible to describe. It is one of those smells (like honeysuckle, lavender or lemon) that I use to describe OTHER smells. The adjective that comes to mind is...clean. Very fresh. In a strange way, it reminds me of the wonderful smell of clothes that have dried on the clothes line in the sun. Only a little more floral. Or something. Okay, I give up.

Anonymous said...

To me, they smell a lot like phlox. Do those have a strong odor, for you?

I have grow them outdoors as an annual bulb a couple of times but never really had much lock. But the bulbs were late purchases from the sale shelf, so it could just be that.

Liza said...

Well, I think it's possible that your former coworker is a liar. Sometimes freesia smells lovely, and sometimes it's too subtle to detect. I think your beginner nose needs another chance. And someone should bitchslap the coworker for going on and on when it was clearly not helpful.

Also, freesias are a pain in the ass to grow.

Anonymous said...

Freesias can be forced indoors. They are lovely flowers but in no way equal the outdoor-grown ones in England. When I was there in April I got myself a fresh bunch every day and they filled the car, the room, wherever, with that ineffable fragrance. As for smells, I happen to think zinnias smell lovely (no once else ever thinks they have a perfume) but simply cannot smell skunk. Not smelling skunk is fine until the dog comes in and loves you to pieces and you find your friends all veering off and asking (from a distance) What have you been doing?

Anonymous said...

I have noticed over the years that they have been bred more for color and size, not for scent. It's a shame. They are so graceful in form, and used to have an equally lovely fragrance. They have always been difficult to force, at least for me, but I kept trying. Maybe some day the pendulum will swing back and the commercial growers will remember when freesias smelled nice.

themanicgardener said...

I can't believe you haven't encountered them before. They were my favorite garden flower in San Diego, but of course here in Montana they're a dream--too far away, too delicate, for me to remember their smell...
--Kate

Paul said...

They smell like Febreeze, just less gross.

Anonymous said...

The senses of smell and taste are influenced by both genetics and experience. Here is a related article on the contentious divide between cilantro lovers and those who can't stand it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/14/dining/14curious.html

Eric said...

I have a very good nose for scents. I go on about the spicy fragrance of some of my Hippeastrum to blank looks. I agree about the Zinnia, since all of them have varying degrees of scent. Skunk? Yes. Fritillaria skunkiness? Yes. Dahlias, too, for pete's sake. Sometimes I sort out very similar irises by fragrance. All sorts of delicate distinctions I can discern. But Freesia? I can't smell them either, or only a little bit. Could be an interesting inheritance study. Maybe we're all descended from someone in an obscure Swedish village or something.

theherbivore said...

Many people find that they smell like fruit loops.... and I agree!

mr_subjunctive said...

the herbivore:

I've smelled a Primula that I thought smelled just like Fruit Loops. Which I guess is as close as I'll be able to get.

Paul said...

I've tried growing freesias indoors. Unfortunately, I find them a bitch to try to bloom. If you have a cold (temps in the 40's and 50s), sunny windowsill you may succeed. They are not warmth-lovers IME

Tom said...

I can't smell these either. I get a wiff of black pepper but that's about it.