Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Pretty picture: Zantedeschia NOID

So I was proofreading the lead-ban post Monday night when it hit me -- I was sick of reading and thinking about lead. I mean, seriously, it's been like a solid week, and although I learned a lot in the process, and had fun, I loaded the page and was just like, I don't think I can do any more of this. So just forget I said anything, okay? It may come back at some point later on: it's not unheard of for me to shelve a post for months, then dust it off and publish it.1

If you're all disappointed because, damn it, you were looking forward to reading about lead contamination, I recommend Root Simple, who recently got their soil tested for lead, with depressing results. (Subsequent testing produced a happier number.) RS has decided to make a theme week out of it, which just happens to coincide with National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week, so there should be all kinds of exciting lead-related information over there, which as a bonus will probably be more relevant to PATSP readers anyway, since it has more to do with plants and gardening.

Zantedeschia NOID. It's yellow.

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5 comments:

orchideya said...

Dialogue with Dr. Ketchum is just hilarious (and, well, educational too)... Are any more of those coming up?

Justin said...

The average American has an alarming amount of lead in their blood, but it's mostly due to the burning of leaded gasoline (which still happens in lots of place in the world, even if it's banned in the US). A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson covers this to some degree (it's also a great read, I highly recommend it). Too bad you're not gonna post.

mr_subjunctive said...

orchideya:

There have been vague plans for a "Dr. Ketchum and Mr. Subjunctive in the 22nd century" post for years, but it's been a lot harder to write, and I don't get a lot of opportunities to work on it.

Paul said...

Beautiful yellow on that Zantedeschia bloom. Years ago I actually had planted two Zans up at my folks's place. Surprisingly they actually survived the Michigan winters. (Never got to see any blooms -- not sure why. But the foliage was very nice.) Finally decided to dig them up one spring while rearranging that particular bed. One bulb was at least the size of a softball. Gave that one to a friend of mine. The other was a bit smaller than a baseball which I kept but moved to a different spot. Oddly enough, even though it was only a move of about 2 ft, it did not successfully overwinter. Don't know if it was just coincidence or what....

Andrew Ablenas said...

Very lovely bloom. I'm going to hope that things are better in Canada with less leaded gas. Maybe I should look it up.